Creating A Disaster Recovery Plan & Why It’s Hard

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Creating A Disaster Recovery Plan Against All Odds

Creating A Disaster Recovery PlanIt can often be a real challenge for a family to get their heads around the idea of creating a disaster recovery plan for many reasons. For one, creating a disaster recovery plan is a lot of work if it is done right but there may be several others at work as well. Maybe not all the members of the family are on board with the need to have a disaster plan at all or don’t even believe there could ever be one.

There may even be some financial considerations that create a conflict about where the resources should be used but one that I had not thought of until I read a article recently was that when faced with distressing situations, sometimes familiarities just choose to ignore the problem altogether. This was researched in a area of the US where there was not only finical disaster but also a disaster in the environment as well as health consequences brought on by a mining operation that had effected many people in the city.

Creating A Disaster Recovery Plan Is As Much Mental As Physical

Although this research isn’t directly related to prepping it does seem that the psychological conclusions could be applied if one steps back for a moment and considers the propensity we all have to believe or want to believe, things will probably stay the same. Have you ever seen that happen in your family? Maybe someone is facing a situation and rather than do all they can they act as if noting unusual is happening at all. That is exactly what I see happening everyday as I talk to people that express no concern about the eventual outcome of the direction our world is heading.

Here is an excerpt from the Buffalo.edu article about the research:

Title: Study Looks At How Families React To Environmental Disaster

“Suddenly, you’ve got two disasters: an economic disaster and a medical disaster. It’s not surprising that some families decide, ‘let’s stop talking about it.’”

By Ellen Goldbaum,
Environmental disasters impact individuals and communities; they also affect how family members communicate with each other, sometimes in surprising ways, according to a paper published by a UB faculty member in the Journal of Family Issues.

The study is the first systematic analysis of how families communicate when faced with serious health issues brought on by “slow moving technological disasters,” like environmental disasters. The purpose was to identify how people in families communicate when they are facing these issue…

Later in the same article this statement really defines how it happens in different families:

Orom and her colleagues identified five communication patterns within the affected families, which they characterized as open/supportive; silent/supportive; open/conflictual; silent/conflictual and silent/denial. They speculated that the silent and conflictual types of communication could be barriers to attitudes and behaviors that… could increase psychological distress in families.

It is important to consider these types of communication patterns and family dynamics as one starts out on a journey to create a disaster recovery plan and be as much as possible, prepared for whatever may come along as a result of the economic decisions and policies that are being forced upon us going forward.

Creating A Disaster Recovery Plan – The Time Is Now

Now is the moment for us all to do the hard work of preparing while there is still time. Do you even have emergency food and water? What would happen on day 4 with no services available to you? I found a video that addresses the psychological aspects of an emergency or disaster and I think it has some good tips that we can use no matter what sort of out of the ordinary situation we may face. Keep in mind that disaster may not strike in an instant like it is often portrayed but we may in fact find ourselves slowly being forced into desperate situations and these physiological effects may creep up on us just the same. It could even be worse as sometimes the anticipation of a thing is worse than the thing itself or may cause us to more easily ignore the obvious warning signs compared to if they were suddenly changed at once. Take a quick look a the video and then we can list the highlights of where to put the emphasis.

In the video they stressed several points that are useful for us to think about as we are creating a disaster recovery plan:

  • Take care of and be concerned  about your physical survival first
  • Next be concerned and attend to your physiological needs
  • Connect with those around you to help each other
  • Share resources among one another, you will get further along as a group
  • Stay informed but don’t dwell on the situation all the time, give your mind a rest
  • Stay calm and help to calm one another
  • Occupy the empty time so you don’t panic or let your mind imagine and dwell on the worst
  • Be flexible at all times, most critical situations call for minute by minute changes because they are uncharted
  • Get help if you need it after the immediate crisis is passed or as soon as you can
  • There are even places you can seek out that offer a sort of first aid psychological training. Note, there is training by several organizations and even free training online from the government at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/professional/manuals/psych-first-aid.asp This course is quite extensive and I have included a table of contents below for you to consider:

Creating A Disaster Recovery Plan

In the end, as you begin creating a disaster recovery plan it just might not be as straight a path as you think when the light bulb goes on in your head and you may have to be prepared for more than just some sort of disaster. You might need to be prepared for the differing reactions and processes that those around you need to go through to catch up with you. I know that was exactly what has happened to me and continues to happen to those and myself as I grapple with creating a disaster recovery plan in the hope that I will be more ready than most for what is coming.

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