Emergency Food Disaster Preparation… Eat Bugs!

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Emergency Food Is Not Always What You Expect It To Be

eat bugsAs I read the quote below and many, many more like it in the preparation for this site and as I do the things that I write about to prepare for what may be coming, I think it is past time time to start stockpiling ammo (more) and getting accustomed to eating bugs… as emergency food of course.

As the debt burden and currency debauchery game rise together toward some form of climactic end-game, the sense of politicians simply not getting the point is almost comical. Just when it were most needed, evidence of urgency from government is invisible. – Tim Price, Director of Investment at PFP Wealth Management in London

Those of North America and Europe will usually turn up our noses at the thought of eating bugs, if not out right gag a little, but apparently 10% of the protein in the world is from bugs and 75-80% of the countries in the world already eat over a thousand different species. We may just need to catch up with the rest of the world at least as a source of emergency food if we can’t catch a miracle real soon.

In my learning about “entomophagy” (eating bugs) I found a research paper prepared by a university in Nigeria that went into great detail about the value of bugs as food not only in the past societies but also into the future. The top three insects they studies had crude protein content of 29.62, 28.42 and 26.8%, two of those three are higher protein concentrations than the fish and beef most of us eat now. What they said was not so different than what I had found in other places but was the fact that the paper referenced much more research that has been done on this very topic with my conclusion being that this is not some fad or contrived information but a solid answer to some of the worlds real problems. It also could be an answer to some of our problems should we be faced with having to find alternate emergency food supply or as supplements to what we have prepared ahead of any disaster that may be headed our way.

Emergency Food To Us Is Regular Diet To Others

Here is a paragraph from that study and a link.

A number of insect or their products were used as food in some parts of Nigeria and to a large extent eaten as titbits or exclusively by children (Ene 1963). Insects have played an important part in the history of human nutrition in Africa, Asia, and Latin America (Bodenheimer, 1951). Hundreds of insect species have been used as human food, some of the more important groups include grasshopper, caterpillars, beetle grubs and sometimes adults, winged termites (some of which are very large in the tropics), bee, wasp and ant brood (larvae and pupae) as well as winged ants, cicadas, and a variety of aquatic insects. Ordinarily, insects are not used as emergency food during shortages, but are included as a planned part of the diet throughout the year or when seasonally available.

https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/6678/1/jb06047.pdf

Those that have the most protein can be broken down into two classes, those that hop and those that slither. Personally I think the hoppers would be an easier place to start if I needed them as free emergency food. You probably already know this but the FDA allows a certain amount of “bug parts” in food. They are not intentional included in the foods but you are already consuming bugs. You just may not have been aware of how good it is for you or at least that it is not bad for you.

I ran across quite a few websites that had a little about the topic and hardly any about bugs as a normal diet or as emergency food. Mostly the sites  just mention the fact as a curiosity and or that it was done but I found two that were of particular interest and wanted to pass them on to my readers.

The first is an in-depth look at what is called “entomophagy” (eating bugs) and the other is actually a site that has recipes for bugs which I found quite interesting. For our purposes as bulk emergency food, these will likely be merely a supplement to our emergency disaster preparations that we are already making but having one more source of high quality protein as a back up or adjunct to our emergency food supply is great to have.

The first site I am referring to had this to say about the topic:

Although the U.N. advocates eating bugs as a way to feed the hungry and end “costly” farming, many of us would use this information as a last resort to starving to death. You’ve probably seen Les Stroud, or Bear Grylls eating bugs on their respective survival shows. I can tell you that it will be a long time before I can scrub from my mind the image of grub guts being splattered through clenched teeth. It really doesn’t have to be that graphic or repulsive. Insects can be prepared in ways much like our normal everyday foods which can help cut down on the ‘revolting’ factor.

First, a list of edible insects, courtesy of Girl Meets Bug:
“Agave worm, Carpenter ants, Lemon ants, Leafcutter ants, Honeypot ants, Bamboo worms, Bees, Cicada, Cockroach (not house ones), Cricket, Dragonfly, Dung beetle, Earthworms, Fly pupa, Flying ant, Grasshopper, Hornworm, Jumiles, June bugs, Locust, Louse, Mopane worm, Meal worm, Midge fly, Nsenene, Pill bug, Rhino beetle and grubs, Sago bug, Silk worm, Scorpion, Tarantula, Termites, Wasp, Walking stick, Water bug, Waxworm, Wichetty Grubs.”

Bugs to Avoid -Courtesy of Chris Needham of Infolific.com
“Unfortunately, many of the bugs you come across shouldn’t be eaten even in a survival situation. Here are some guidelines for what to avoid.
* Bugs that are generally associated with carrying diseases should not be eaten. This includes flies, mosquitoes, and ticks.
* Some bugs use poison for capturing prey and for defense making them inedible so avoid centipedes, scorpions, and spiders.
* As a general rule, bugs with fine hairs, bright colors, or eight or more legs are off limits. More

One of the most interesting things this article had in it was a chart showing the nutritional value of different bugs that they copied from Iowa State University so I went over to their site and put the original chart in the post below:

prepper food for disaster bug protein

Now tell me that is not a good source of emergency food that would be available in varying quantities to almost everyone. I am pretty sure with a little planning you could grow your own emergency food in a pretty quick period of time and with almost no equipment or expense.

Emergency Food Can Be Good Tasting

The other site that I found to be extremely interesting was all about how to prepare these tiny morsels of solid emergency food goodness. Thinking of these recipes as prepper food for disasters is interesting and after reading through a few of the recipes,  I found them to be almost something I could see myself doing someday, at least as an experiment and another way to be Prepper-Ready. Who knows, as time goes on, you may see a youtube video of me doing just that. Here is what that site had to say about how smart eating bugs can be for we humans and for the environment and especially for you and I preparing for an economic collapse or any other disaster.

According to the Entomological Society of America insects generally contain more protein and are lower in fat than traditional meats. In addition they have about 20 times higher food conversion efficiency than traditional meats. In other words they have a better feed-to-meat ratio than beef, pork, lamb or chicken.

It can best be understood at least in part with a comparative breakdown of cricket to beef. 100 grams of cricket contains 121 calories, 12.9 grams of protein, 5.5 g. fat, 5.1 g. carbohydrates, 75.8 mg. calcium, 9.5 mg. iron, 3.10 mg. niacin, 1.09 mg. riboflavin, 185.3 mg. phosphorous, and 0.36 mg. thiamine. By comparison ground beef contains more protein (23.5 g./100g.), but also has 288.2 calories, almost three times the amount of crickets, and a whopping 21.2 grams of fat, almost four times the amount of crickets!

Insects are exothermic, which means they get their heat from the surrounding environment, while birds and mammals are endothermic, which means they have to heat themselves up, requiring lots of energy and consequently a major impact on the environment and on natural resources. The big advantage to being exothermic in this respect is that insects save a huge amount of energy.

And comparatively speaking, being able to survive on a fifth of the amount of food required of familiar livestock is a major advantage when considering the impact of our footprint on the environment. Farming insects as miniature livestock is a smarter, more efficient and ultimately environmentally safer means of sustaining a healthy and convenient food supply.

You are likely to see more about this topic here as I think it holds a lot of potential for those of us that are concerned about preparing for disaster of any sort. We need to think outside the box and we need to have multiple options for all our needs. Backups for our backup preparations if you will. That is what the preppers lifestyle is all about. We are Prepper-Ready at all times. To be continued… but in the mean time here is a very informative video that goes into a lot of details about bugs as food around the world and even further confirmation it could be another level of preparation for everyone.

I think back to the first time I had sushi and I remember that I was really scared and if it had not been for some serious peer pressure I probably would never have done it but I am certainly glad I did today and I really hope that this is exactly the same thing that happens one day when I get up the nerve to try eating bugs at least as a emergency food source in case of economic collapse.

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